Why is writing important to you and why do you think it's an important medium for the world?
Writing is how I make my living as an Associated Press reporter, so it's obviously important financially. But if I'm not working on my journalism, I'm writing fiction, so by this time in my life it's hardwired inside me as what I do personally and professionally. Despite all the other content that's out there, writing still has the power to sweep us away, whether through a compelling piece of reporting or the dreamscape of a novel. That's more important than ever now.

What are your tried and tested remedies to cure writer's block?
To paraphrase the expression attributed to many famous writers, I only write when I'm inspired, and I make sure I'm inspired every day at 6 a.m. I tend to think of this more in terms of writer's challenge, and on days when things aren't flowing, I'll do everything from take a short break and walk around to allow myself to put anything down on the page--even gibberish--to jump start my brain. Usually I'm back on track shortly.

What is your favorite time to write?
I'm a morning person, and with my day job I have to be an even earlier morning person. So I work on my fiction from around 6-8 each morning, before switching gears and putting on my reporter's cap.

What's the best piece of writing advice you've ever received and would like to impart to other writers?
Even a few words are better than none. The only book you'll ever regret is the one you never started writing, so it's better to try a little every day than not write at all.

What excites you most about being a writer in today's age?
Communicating fresh and accurate ideas and information is more valuable than ever today.

Columbus Noir, edited by Andrew Welsh-Huggins, is out now with Akashic Books.