Copyright

Hachette UK Chief Exec Tells China Newspaper: We Represent Authors and Authors Deserve to Get Paid

How do you protect the intellectual property of authors in the digital market?

The question was posed this weekend to Tim Hely Hutchinson, group chief executive of Hachette UK, during an interview with the South China Morning Post. Hutchinson responded:

“One of the most important new roles for publishers is the protection of copyright – how do we protect authors against piracy and casual file sharing? We have a subcontractor who sweeps the internet every day to find infringing editions and we send every infringer a takedown notice. If they persist we take legal action. And that is successful – the books do get taken down.”

Hutchinson also discussed DRM (encrypting digital files such as ebooks to discourage illegal copying), a hot-button topic in some circles:

“And on casual file sharing, we strongly support the maintenance of DRM – digital rights management – so all the files, e-books and audio are encrypted and all our contracts with people like Amazon make it impossible for people to share or to lend. Lots of people say take DRM off, it’s old-fashioned, but that’s wrong. Our primary job is to represent authors and authors deserve to be paid. One way is by making sure we keep the DRM on.”

While the interviewer did not specifically mention piracy in China, widespread theft of intellectual property in the country makes DRM all the more important.

Last year Hachette opened a sales office in Hong Kong, stepping up its focus on the region. During the interview, Hutchinson contrasted Asia’s robust growth to the “relatively small and static market” for books in the U.K. And he said Asian readers tend to prefer nonfiction such as business and self-improvement books. “It’s less literary and more to do with getting on in life,” he said.

Posted in Copyright, E-Books, General

Appellate Court: Class Certification Ruling in Google Books Case Puts Cart Before Horse

Class certification is premature in the Google mass books digitization case, says a federal appellate court. Fair use has to be decided first.

In the latest twist in the litigations over Google’s library-scanning project, The Second Circuit Court of Appeals yesterday vacated Judge Denny Chin’s class certification ruling* of last May in Authors Guild v. Google.  The appellate court said that resolution of the fair use issues needed to come first since it would help determine whether “the commonality of plaintiffs’ injuries, the typicality of their claims, and the predominance of common questions of law or fact” merited treating the lawsuit as a class action.

In other words, if Google’s fair use defense requires a book-by-book analysis, then this would weigh against class certification. If a fair use ruling can be made more broadly, then judicial economy is more likely to weigh on the side of class certification.

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Posted in Advocacy, Copyright, E-Books

Swift Action After Blogger Calls Out Plagiarism

An author caught selling a book that plagiarizes from works by romance writers Tammara Webber and Jamie McGuire is blaming a rogue ghostwriter for the copying and has removed the book from all sales outlets.

The author, Jordin Williams, tweeted: “I am officially letting all funds go. I’m sadden by this that a ghostwriter did this through guru. Thankfully I never received any money.”

Jane Litte of the Dear Author blog noticed the plagiarism and posted screen shots of Williams’ Amazingly Broken alongside strikingly similar passages from Webber and McGuire Wednesday. The book was pulled within hours of the Dear Author post, after readers complained directly to Amazon and to Williams via social media.

In a Twitter conversation posted by Jason Boog on the GalleyCat blog, Williams apologized directly to Webber and McGuire. She said she hired the writer who copied their work through the online freelancer marketplace odesk.com (she earlier thought she’d used Guru.com). Williams tweeted, “I take the blame. Just saying how it happened. I do wish someone would give me a website to check plagiarism of ‘books’. Others don’t work.”

Posted in Copyright, E-Books, General

Nigeria Takes on Piracy with Education. Better than McGruff the Crime Dog?

Here’s an idea we wouldn’t mind seeing spread: Nigeria is starting a program to teach secondary school students the importance of respecting copyright.

The Guardian Nigeria reports that the Nigerian Copyright Commission will send staff to schools talk about the issue. The program launched with a one-day “copyright sensitization workshop” for over 300 students.

Speaking at the event, Director-General, NCC, Afam Ezekude, who noted that one of the cardinal goals of the commission is to disseminate copyright knowledge, adding that the commission wants to take its campaign against piracy to the grassroots by engaging students at early stage to enable them know the importance of copyright and how to respect other people’s intellectual property.

NCC, he stated, would launch a Copyright Virtue Club, an internet club warehousing general information for children on copyright issues and great authors.

In a lesson that students everywhere could use, an NCC official also urged the students to resist the temptations of plagiarism, calling it a form of piracy.

The school initiative is part of Nigeria’s larger effort to crack down on piracy with tougher penalties and stepped up enforcement. While Nigeria clearly recognizes a need to improve copyright protection, it is apparently already doing a better job than many nations. It did not make the U.S. government’s latest list of worst offenders of intellectual property rights (its neighbor to the north, Algeria, did).

Here in the U.S., McGruff the Crime Dog’s on the case, delivering the cheery message that “it’s easy to stay on the straight and narrow.” For those dozen or so kids eager to stay on the straight and narrow, McGruff provides a list of 10 “don’ts” and other fun suggestions:

It’s easy to stay on the straight and narrow.

• When you buy a tune on the Internet and download it, make sure you don’t send a copy to a friend or someone who might sell it to others.

Read More…

Posted in Copyright, General

Piracy, Bribery, Profit? Amazon Releases Kindle Into Complex Chinese Book Market

Will the availability of the Kindle be enough to convince Chinese readers to actually pay for the ebooks they download? That’s the hope as Amazon starts selling its Kindle Paperwhite and Kindle HD Fire in a nation of rampant piracy.

Stemming copyright violations would require quite a change in mindset. Consider a 2012 survey of nearly 19,000 Chinese readers, as reported in the People’s Daily Online:

The survey, carried out by the  Chinese Academy of Press and Publication, also showed that 40.1 percent of respondents who have read e-books before would be willing to pay for the books, down 1.7 percent year on year.

So, six out of 10 ebook readers in China would not even be theoretically willing to spend money on the titles they download.

Amazon is hoping to discourage piracy by keeping prices low, selling most ebooks at the equivalent of $1.63. But it will also have to convince consumers to choose the Kindle over cheaper Chinese e-readers, as Bloomberg reports:

Amazon, a brand known for bargains in most of the places it operates, finds itself in a more premium position with its Kindle products in China. The Paperwhite costs 849 yuan. E-Commerce China Dangdang, one of Amazon’s Chinese competitors, began selling its own e-reader there a year ago. The price: 599 yuan.

Amazon’s move comes on the heels of a scandal highlighting China’s pervasive problems with copyright, the arrest of Lou Li, the founder of that country’s largest online literature site, Qidian. Press accounts differ as to the nature of his alleged misdeeds–reports have him arrested for either selling copyrighted material that belonged to Qidian’s parent company or accepting bribes in a copyright negotiation.

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Posted in Advocacy, Authorship, Copyright, E-Books, General, Royalties

Remember the Orphans? Battle Lines Being Drawn in HathiTrust Appeal

Organizations were lining up to file briefs in the HathiTrust appeal this week. Before we get to that, however, let’s take a moment to recap for those of you who may be foggy on the details of this mass book digitization lawsuit.

In the fall of 2011, authors’ groups from Australia, Canada, Norway, Sweden, UK and US (ourselves and the Authors League Fund) and eleven individual authors sued digital book repository HathiTrust and five universities over their storage and use of millions of books. The basic facts are pretty clear. Everyone agrees that some of the universities authorized Google to digitize copyright-protected books by the million (we say seven million, but we think that’s conservative). Those books comprised nearly the entire stacks of some university libraries, and included in print and out of print books by authors from all over the world in dozens of languages.

Google employees and contractors produced complete digital replicas of each library book and converted those page scans into machine-readable digital text. Google then gave the libraries the resulting ebooks — a readable page-by-page image file accompanied by an embedded, searchable digital text file for each of the seven million books. For its trouble, the libraries agreed that Google could keep its own copy of the ebooks it created. (Google’s actions are the subject of a separate, ongoing, seemingly unending, class-action lawsuit, Authors Guild v. Google, which we and representative plaintiffs brought in 2005.) Neither Google nor the libraries sought or obtained authors’ or publishers’ permission to convert their books into machine-readable form for ingestion by Google and the university library data centers.

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Posted in Advocacy, Authorship, Copyright, E-Books, General

Random House Provides Online Tool for Reporting Piracy

Random House is now encouraging its authors to report suspected online piracy of their books through its Author Portal. The portal provides information on the suspected piracy directly to Digimarc Guardian, a company working with Random House to remove stolen ebooks from the Internet. Digimarc will verify whether the link actually leads to your book (often the links are fake) and, if so, “immediate legal steps will be taken.”

For more information, see the publisher’s Random Notes blog.

Posted in Copyright, E-Books, General

Congress Begins Copyright Review, Hoping for Consensus, Civility

Lawmakers looking to overhaul U.S. copyright law heard testimony on Thursday that underscored a crucial difference between the present and any other time in history: Copyright is now something the general public is aware of daily, which makes the issue far more contentious.

In the first in a series of hearings on copyright, the House Judiciary Committee invited five members of a study group, The Copyright Principals Project, to testify, Adi Robertson of The Verge website reported.

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Posted in Copyright

Who is the Baddest of them All? Ukraine, says U.S. Gov

The U.S. government is calling out Ukraine for its shoddy enforcement of intellectual property rights laws, putting the Eastern European nation literally in a class by itself among trading partners who fail to protect copyright holders.

A new report from the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative designates Ukraine a Priority Foreign Country (PFC), a benign-sounding label reserved for the worst intellectual property rights offenders. It’s been more than seven years since a U.S. trading partner had PFC status.  That country? Ukraine, a PFC from 2001 to 2005, when it improved its practices enough to (temporarily) lose the designation.

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Posted in Advocacy, Copyright

Appellate Court in Google Lawsuit: Is Class Certification Review Premature?

An aspect of our class-action copyright infringement action over Google’s scanning of millions of library books was before a federal appellate court today. Before we get to that, let’s review where we are.

Last May, Judge Chin made a key ruling, certifying a class of U.S. authors with registered copyrights in the books scanned by Google. In July, attorneys for authors and for Google filed cross-motions for summary judgment (essentially, judgment following discovery and depositions based on undisputed facts) with Judge Chin. The outcome of those motions will almost certainly turn on whether Judge Chin deems Google’s book digitization project to be a fair use.

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Posted in Advocacy, Authorship, Copyright