Blog

The Authors Guild

Bulletin Board

This week’s batch of prizes is a mixed bag of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry awards. Deadline for each is March 15.

The Bellingham Literary Review Prizes award works of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. The 49th Parallel Poetry Award is given to a poem or group of poems of any style or length. The Tobias Wolff Award for Fiction is given to a short story. And the Annie Dillard Award for Creative Nonfiction is given to an essay. Poetry entries may be up to 3 poems per entry. Short story and essay entries may be up to 6,000 words. The winners will receive $1,000 and publication in the Bellingham Review. Entry fee: $20; additional entries $10 each. Deadline: March 15, 2014. For more information, please visit the website.

The Colorado Review is currently accepting submissions for the Nelligan Prize for best short story. Stories must be previously unpublished. There are no theme restrictions, but stories must be under 50 pages. The winner will receive $2,000 and publication in the Fall 2014 issue of the Colorado Review. All stories will be considered for publication. Entry fee: $15 ($17 online). Deadline: March 15, 2014. For more information, please visit the website.

Read More…

Along Publishers Row

by Campbell Geeslin

In London, The Hatchet Job of the Year Award went to A. A. Gill for his Sunday Times review of Morrissey’s Autobiography. The autobiographer is a British singer and lyricist.

Gill wrote: “This is a book that cries out like one of his maudlin ditties to be edited. . .It is a heavy tome, utterly devoid of insight, warmth, wisdom or likability.”

Gill also wrote that the book was “a potential firelighter of vanity, self-pity and logorrheic dullness. . . laughably overwrought and overwritten, a litany of retrospective hurt and score settling.”

The judges said Gill’s review was the “angriest, funniest and most trenchant” book review of the year. It is available on the Omnivore website, and quotes were generous in The Guardian and The New York Times. “Gill’s evisceration of Morrissey has a kind of music of its own,” said The Los Angeles Times.

Gill’s Hatchet Job Award was an ax buried in a book and a year’s supply of potted shrimp.

Read More…

New Books by Members

This week’s recent and upcoming books by our members include titles by Caroline Bock, Kathleen Long Bostrom, Sylviane A. Diouf, Anne Isaacs, Melissa Kantor, Susan Kuklin, Scott Lax, Janice Levy, Sophie Littlefield, Vinton Rafe McCabe, Jennifer McMahon, Charles Sheehan-Miles, and Judy Sierra. Titles under the jump.

Read More…

Along Publishers Row

by Campbell Geeslin

Someone at The New York Times Book Review must have been shot by Cupid’s arrow. In a roundup just before Valentine’s Day, 20 authors responded to the question, “What can literature tell us about love?”

Eileen Myles, author of Inferno: A Poet’s Novel, wrote: “Literature is love. I think it went like this: drawings in the cave, sounds in the cave, songs in the cave, songs about us. Later, stories about us. Part of what we always did was have sex and fight about it and break each other’s hearts… We love the feel of making the marks as the feelings are rising and falling. Living in literature and love is the best thing there is. You’re always home.”

Read More…

New Books by Members

This week’s recent and upcoming books by our members include titles by Jerome Charyn, Camilla T. Crespi, Pat Cummings, Megan Hustad, Doris Iarovici, Sara Latta, Edmund Levin, Mark A. Michaels and Patricia Johnson, Jamie Michalak, Michelle Richmond, Sheila Turnage, Michael Wex, and Kay Winters. Titles under the jump.

Read More…

Bulletin Board

This week’s batch of contests includes an Asian American poetry prize, a LAMBDA award, and a residency in Oregon. Deadlines range from March 1-15.

The Kundiman Poetry Prize is awarded to an exceptional book of poetry by an Asian American poet. The winner will receive $1,000 and book publication by Alice James Books. Manuscripts must be 50-70 pages in length. Individual poems from the manuscript may have been previously published but the collection as a whole must be unpublished. Translations and self-published books are not eligible. Entry fee: $28. Deadline: March 15, 2014. For more information, please visit the website.

The LAMBDA Outstanding Mid-Career Novelist Prize recognizes LGBT authors who have written and published at least three novels, or two novels and substantial additional literary work such as poetry, short stories, and essays. Age is not a factor in defining mid-career. The winners receive $5,000 each. Deadline: March 7, 2014. For more information, including how to nominate a candidate, please visit the website.

Read More…

Along Publishers Row

by Campbell Geeslin

A select number of New York authors are being paid to appear at book club meetings where their books are on the menu.

Book the Writer was started by novelist Jean Hanff Korelitz last month. The club pays $750. Book the Writer’s cut is $350; the author gets $400. Venues are limited to Manhattan and Brooklyn.

Korelitz, the author of Admission (2009) and a recent transplant to Manhattan with her husband, the poet Paul Muldoon, told The New York Times, “Most of us, whether or not we are ‘successful,’ really struggle financially in the city. Also, we’ve reached this point at which we’ve come to assume art should be free, and copyright is under assault, etc., and the bald fact is that the artist has to live, too. So I liked the idea of creating (or at least extending) a new income source for writers.”

Book the Writer authors for hire include Kurt Anderson, A.M. Homes, Zoe Heller, Amy Soln and Alexandra Styron.

Read More…

New Books by Members

This week’s recent and upcoming books by our members include titles by Rabih Alameddine, Susan Cheever, Joseph J. Gabriele, Dorothy Gallagher, Cindy Jenson-Elliott, John Katzenbach, Michael Kurland, Sarah-Kate Lynch, Shirley Rousseau Murphy, Penelope Rowlands, Charles Sheehan-Miles, Lan Sluder, April Smith, and Tracy Weber. Titles under the jump.

Read More…

Bulletin Board

This week’s batch of contests includes prizes for fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry, as well as an award for writers with children under the age of 18. Deadlines range from Feb 15-28.

The Arcadia Short Story Contest is currently seeking exceptionally well-crafted short stories. Submissions should be between 4,000 and 7,000 words. There are no criteria for style or substance. The winner will receive $1,000 and publication in Arcadia 8. Entry fee: $15. Deadline: February 15, 2014. For more information, please visit the website.

The Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) sponsors annual competitions for book-length works: the Donald Hall Prize for Poetry and the Grace Paley Prize for Short Fiction, both of which award the winners $5,500 and publication, as well as AWP Prize for Creative Nonfiction and AWP Prize for the Novel, the winners of which receive $2,500 and publication. The competition is open to all authors writing in English regardless of nationality or residence, and is available to published and unpublished authors alike. Only book-length manuscripts are eligible. The Award Series defines “book-length” as: 48 pages minimum text for poetry collections; 150-300 manuscript pages for short story or creative nonfiction collections; and at least 60,000 words for novel manuscripts. Entry fee: $20 for AWP members, $30 for nonmembers. Deadline: February 28, 2014. For more information, please visit the website.

The Sustainable Arts Foundation Writing Award is intended for individual writers with families (at least one child under the age of 18). Applicants from the San Francisco bay area will be given preference, but writers from anywhere can apply. Writers working in fiction, nonfiction, playwriting, and poetry are encouraged to apply. The winners will receive $6,000. Applicants should submit their portfolio as well as a biography, an artist statement, their CV, and a description of how they will use the award. Entry fee: $10. Deadline: February 28, 2014. For more information, please visit the website.

Along Publishers Row

by Campbell Geeslin

With all the hysterical headlines and TV chatter about the Super Bowl, how about a time out? The game has been around a long time.

Back in 1925, Robert Benchley wrote an essay entitled, “How to Watch Football.” This was before television. To smart guys like Benchley, Prohibition, which began in 1920, was a joke.

Benchley’s suggestion was: “Start drinking from the flask at, let us say, ten o’clock in the morning of the game. If necessary, or rather as soon as necessary, re-fill the flask. Be within calling-distance of a good, soft couch, with an easy pillow for the head. Don’t eat any lunch. Turn the heat on in the room and shut the windows.

“Then when it comes time. . .for the game, you will already have started with Old Grandpa Sandman, on the road to Never-Never Land . . . .You, my little man, will be safe and warm at home, [which] after all, is the place to be on the afternoon of the game.”

Read More…