Scott Turow’s New York Times Op-Ed on Shakespeare’s Paywall

Read Scott Turow’s New York Times op-ed here.

Comments: more
  • http://viralize.com.au/sitemap/ Viralize

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  • http://viralize.com.au/sitemap/ Viralize

    Facinating discovers found. Amazing how something burried can last so long and in such a great condition to be found later in time.

  • Mary Rasenberger

    I have written a friendly response to those critiquing the op-ed (many of whom seemed to have missed the point of the piece altogether):
    “A Friday Night: Reflections on the Critiques of “Would the Bard have Survived the Web?” at
    http://nysbar.com/blogs/EASL/

  • Mary Rasenberger

    I have written a friendly response to those critiquing the op-ed (many of whom seemed to have missed the point of the piece altogether):
    “A Friday Night: Reflections on the Critiques of “Would the Bard have Survived the Web?” at
    http://nysbar.com/blogs/EASL/

  • http://www.facebook.com/grantland.rice Grantland S. Rice

    As a friendly addendum, I have penned a challenge to Turow et. al:

    “Would The American Revolution Have Survived Copyright.”

    http://academypartners.org/?p=1407

    Hope it helps advance the conversation.

    Cordially,

    Grantland S. Rice

  • http://www.facebook.com/grantland.rice Grantland S. Rice

    As a friendly addendum, I have penned a challenge to Turow et. al:

    “Would The American Revolution Have Survived Copyright.”

    http://academypartners.org/?p=1407

    Hope it helps advance the conversation.

    Cordially,

    Grantland S. Rice

  • http://www.facebook.com/grantland.rice Grantland S. Rice

    Kudos to Authors Guild head Scott Turow and his colleagues for offering up a useful metonymy for copyright in the “pay wall” formed by The Globe Theater!

    The debate sparked by Turow’s provocative piece forces readers to grapple with the importance of copyright, something often lost in the dry debates over intellectual property policy.

    As a friendly addendum, I have penned a brief challenge to Turow et. al. entitled:

    “Would The American Revolution Have Survived Copyright.”

    http://academypartners.org/?p=1407

    My point is to contribute a brief historical overview of the relationship between authorship and (Anglo-American) copyright in hopes of suggesting that the dance between pay walls and great writers has been, historically speaking, closer the tango than to a two-step.

    Hope this contribution helps advance the conversation.

    Cordially,

    Grantland S. Rice

  • http://www.facebook.com/grantland.rice Grantland S. Rice

    Kudos to Authors Guild head Scott Turow and his colleagues for offering up a useful metonymy for copyright in the “pay wall” formed by The Globe Theater!

    The debate sparked by Turow’s provocative piece forces readers to grapple with the importance of copyright, something often lost in the dry debates over intellectual property policy.

    As a friendly addendum, I have penned a brief challenge to Turow et. al. entitled:

    “Would The American Revolution Have Survived Copyright.”

    http://academypartners.org/?p=1407

    My point is to contribute a brief historical overview of the relationship between authorship and (Anglo-American) copyright in hopes of suggesting that the dance between pay walls and great writers has been, historically speaking, closer the tango than to a two-step.

    Hope this contribution helps advance the conversation.

    Cordially,

    Grantland S. Rice

  • WilliamCecil

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  • WilliamCecil

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    Today, that would run, “Sweet are the uses of advertising.”

  • Judyashore

    So why do we have so many pirate sites stealing our work and giving away our intellectual property, making money for themselves, and leaving us out of the game?

  • Judyashore

    So why do we have so many pirate sites stealing our work and giving away our intellectual property, making money for themselves, and leaving us out of the game?

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