Authors Registry Passes $5 Million Milestone

The Authors Registry, the not-for-profit organization founded by the Authors Guild and others in 1995, has now distributed more than $5.2 million to authors. The Registry has paid more than $1 million to authors this year alone, a record for the organization. Most of the fees and royalties the Registry distributes are from foreign rights societies, principally the Authors Licensing and Collecting Society in London, Kopinor, the Norwegian photocopy rights administrator, and from LIRA, an authors’ rights organization in The Netherlands. The Registry has distributed payments, ranging from as little as $10 to several thousand dollars, to thousands of authors. The Registry retains a 5% commission from payments to authors in order to recoup some of its operating costs.

For more information on the Authors Registry, including a list of 300 authors the Registry has been unable to reach for whom the Registry is holding more than $100,000, please visit its website at www.authorsregistry.org

Comments: more
  • Carol S. Fowler

    As a writer, I must put the warning out to anyone who has an idea of publishing with Kindle.  My suggestion is, DON’T!  I just went through a two month long battle with Kindle and they, as well as the rest of Amazon, have slammed the door in my face, and I have no other recourse.  I will make this scenerio short but to the point.  I have published two books with them.  There were 815 books that went out on one of them and 116 on another.  Out of 815 books, I’m only entitled to royalties on 3, and of the 116 I’m entitled to royalties on 2 books.  They claim the unpayable books went out for free.  This is very hard to believe that it was that many that went out free, especially when I have proof to the contrary.  If your a writer, particularly a new one and don’t want your dreams crushed, DON’T publish with them.

  • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/MSPQEL2WJYL4Z6VOMVBUR3LD5E Paul

    Reading your comments and from other conversations I know of with authors/publishers it’s clear that the opinions of authors/publishers are worse than useless when evaluating e-books. You’re caught up in antiquated ideas and seem completely unable to even understand how out of touch you sound. 

    Independent bookstores unable to compete with Amazon? That’s like jumping back to the 1920′s and complaining about small independent carriage makers unable to compete with Ford or GM.  Or scribes unable to compete with printing presses.

    Of course they can’t compete because they totally incompetent to do so. What does stocking shelves and dusting off books have to do with providing web services, databases, etc. Nothing. 

    How can Amazon provide a lockin to Kindle? All Kindle books can be used on different readers and Kindle readers only cost about the the same as 2-3 hardback books. There is no sunk cost for the consumer.  There is no lockin.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Al-Norman/100003378409262 Al Norman

       ”How can Amazon provide a lockin to Kindle? All Kindle books can be used
      on different readers and Kindle readers only cost about the the same as
      2-3 hardback books. There is no sunk cost for the consumer.  There is no
      lockin.”

      Not exactly true, but I will use this chance to strengthen your argument. It is publishers who decide whether to use DRM, not Amazon, so if an Amazon ebook has DRM, the publisher is to blame.

      The only people locking us into a Kindle format are the publishers.

      • http://twitter.com/philipdsjones Philip Jones

         That’s not entirely true. The Kindle format is a proprietary format that means you’ll have trouble reading a Kindle edition on an alternative reader. If Amazon used ePub, as most others do, your argument would be true.

        • http://www.facebook.com/people/Al-Norman/100003378409262 Al Norman

          “That’s not entirely true. The Kindle format is a proprietary format that
          means you’ll have trouble reading a Kindle edition on an alternative
          reader.”

          Only if it has DRM. Without DRM, the file can legally be converted.

          “If Amazon used ePub, as most others do, your argument would be true.”

          No. ePub can be subject to DRM as well, so the format choice does not matter.

          Non-DRM ebooks are not walled, and many easy to use programs, such as Calibre, will convert those files. Removing DRM is illegal, so which method–the format or DRM–do you think locks in the customer?

    • rebeccamherman

      Let’s be realistic, the pro-cheap ebooks side doesn’t care about all consumers either, just those that read ebooks. I read print only and want physical bookstores to survive and am willing to pay more for books so that print books and bookstores will survive for my future children. I believe that there is a lot of value to books and bookstores that would be lost if books were only sold online and only electronically. So don’t assume you are on the side of all consumers because you are not on the side of this one.