Monthly Archives: November 2013

Along Publishers Row

by Campbell Geeslin

David Orr, author of Beautiful and Pointless: A Guide to Modern Poetry, writes a column for The New York Times Book Review.

He wrote, “At any given moment, millions of people in this country are happily not reading poems, and dozens of poets are happy to say they don’t care.”

Does one have to study poetry to become a fan? Orr quotes Philip Larkin, “Oh, for Christ’s sake, one doesn’t study poets! You read them, and think, that’s marvelous, how is it done, could I do it? And that’s how you learn.”

Orr concludes: “When we talk about accessibility, we should remember that poetry, unlike churches and fortresses, has never loved a wall.”

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End of the Road for Siegel and Shuster Heirs’ “Superman” Battle? A Cautionary Tale

First the Jerry Siegel heirs, in February; now the Joe Shuster heirs. The lawsuits over the rights of the heirs of Superman’s co-creators may be over. The Shuster heirs appear stuck with a 1992 agreement paying a “pension” of $25,000 per year. The Siegel heirs fared much better: their 2001 agreement included $3 million up front and an ongoing 6% of gross revenues.

Last Thursday, an appellate court effectively affirmed DC Comics’ ownership of the copyright for Superman in what may be the final chapter in a long, complex and ultimately losing struggle by the heirs of Superman co-creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster to regain their rights to the iconic superhero.

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Judge Extends Order Blocking Sale of Malcolm X Diaries

On Friday, attorneys for the heirs of Malcolm X told a federal court in Manhattan that The Diary of Malcolm X was available for sale online, in violation of the court’s November 8th temporary restraining order blocking sales of the work. Judge Laura Taylor Swain wasted no time, warning the defendant that it could be held in contempt of court if it disregards her order, and extending the order blocking the sale of the book until a court hearing in January, according to the Associated Press.

The Diary of Malcolm X, which was scheduled to be published earlier this month by Chicago-based Third World Press, is based on journals written by Malcolm X in 1964 as he traveled to the Middle East and Africa. Those journals have been on loan from the civil rights leader’s estate, X Legacy, to the New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center since 2003. X Legacy had filed a copyright infringement suit earlier this month asserting that it had the sole right to publish his diaries.

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New Books by Members

This week’s recent and upcoming releases by Authors Guild members include titles by Tom Clavin, Joe Cottonwood, Jordan Dane, Nicholas Delbanco, Carl Deuker, Karl Taro Greenfeld, R.Z. Halleson, Alden Jones, Laurie Loughlin, John Schulte, Pat Silver-Lasky, Louise Steinman, and James L. Swanson. Titles under the jump.

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New York Times Obituary for Herb Mitgang

Today’s obituary for Herbert Mitgang in The New York Times goes into much more detail than we did yesterday. For example, we wrote about Herb’s work for Stars and Stripes in World War II. The Times tells you he did much more than that during the war, serving as an Army intelligence officer, parachuting into Greece, and earning six battle stars.

The Times highlights Herb Mitgang’s 1988 book Dangerous Dossiers: Exposing the Secret War Against America’s Greatest Authors, which he wrote using FBI, CIA, and other files he obtained through the Freedom of Information Act.

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Herbert Mitgang, Former Authors Guild and Authors League Fund President, Dies at 93

We’ve just learned that our dear friend Herbert Mitgang died this morning at the age of 93. Since joining the Authors Guild in 1957, Herb had been a stalwart supporter of the Guild and its organizations. He served as president of the Authors Guild and the Authors League Fund, devoting countless hours in the service of his fellow writers.

Herbert Mitgang began his distinguished writing career as an army correspondent for Stars and Stripes during World War II; he would soon become managing editor, first for the paper’s Oran-Casablanca edition, then for its Sicily edition.

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Bulletin Board

This week’s batch of contests includes prizes for fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Deadlines range from Dec 23-31.

The Anisfield-Wolf Awards recognize books that have made important contributions to our understanding of racism and our appreciation of the rich diversity of human cultures. Books must be written in English and published in the previous year (books published in 2013 are eligible for the 2014 prizes). Awards are given for both fiction and nonfiction. Works of poetry are eligible for the fiction prize. Plays, screenplays, unpublished manuscripts, and self-published books are not eligible. The winners will receive $10,000 and will be honored at an awards ceremony in Cleveland. Deadline: December 31, 2013. For more information, please visit the website.

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No SOPA: Speakers Downplay Legislation at House Online Piracy Hearing

At a House subcommittee hearing Tuesday to discuss online piracy, speakers emphasized education and voluntary cooperation over legislation, even as they acknowledged that voluntary efforts by search engines–a chief gateway to pirated works–had not been effective. John Eggerton of Broadcasting and Cable reports:

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Not Just the French: Argentina and South Korea Debate Limiting Book Discount

While limits on book discounting in France and Germany receive much more attention, Publishing Perspectives took a recent look, in separate pieces, at how pricing and discounting is shaping the book market in two countries with vastly different reading and book buying cultures–Argentina and Korea.

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Along Publishers Row

by Campbell Geeslin

Are you ready for your close-up?

In a plot twist only a sadist could dream up, a new Italian TV show called Masterpiece pits aspiring novelists against one another reality-show style, with a payoff to the winner of a 100,000 first printing. If the program is a hit in Italy—where writers are revered but sales are pitiful—a U.S. version cannot be far behind.

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